Scotland-Holyrood rejects Brexit plan

Scotland-Holyrood rejects Brexit plan

Editor: Johnathan Meyers | Tactical Investor

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Scotland-Holyrood rejects Brexit plan

In a symbolic, non-binding vote in Holyrood, Scotland’s devolved parliament overwhelmingly rejected UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s plan to exit the EU.

The majority of the Scottish electorate voted to remain in the bloc in last year’s in-out referendum.

Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has repeatedly pushed for her nation’s interests to be taken into consideration during the Brexit negotiations.

But last month (January, 2017) the Supreme Court ruled there was no legal need for Scotland’s parliament to give its consent to the triggering of Article 50, beginning divorce proceedings from the EU.  Full Story

Scotland had to reject the EU withdrawal bill

“There shall be a Scottish parliament.” “I like that,” he added. And eight months later he gave an impassioned speech to the inaugural meeting of that parliament in Edinburgh in which he referred to the restoration of a national legislature as “the day when democracy was renewed in Scotland”.

This morning, the day after that parliament overwhelmingly rejected the EU withdrawal bill in its current form, it’s worth remembering that Dewar’s Labour party was godfather to devolution, and that he campaigned alongside the SNP, the Lib Dems and the Greens to deliver the yes vote that brought it into being. And that Labour, alongside the Lib Dems, formed the first coalition administration in 1999. It helps explain why every party at Holyrood bar the Tories voted to reject this UK legislation, all agreeing that it would strike at the heart of the devolution settlement. Tellingly, that perceived disempowerment formed the centrepiece of Tuesday’s debate.

The constitutional battle, which may well end up in the supreme court in July, centres around the C-word. Since its inception the Holyrood parliament needs to pass a legislative consent motion any time Westminster wants to introduce legislation in areas that are devolved. Under the withdrawal bill Westminster is only offering to consult, rather than seek consent. And, it adds in a less than winning rider, we will go ahead if you agree, and we will go ahead if you don’t. Full Story

Scottish parliament decisively rejects EU withdrawal bill

Imposing powers on Scotland would be unprecedented and fuel Sturgeon’s demands for a second independence referendum, potentially providing the Scottish National party with a further justification for staging one.

Both governments agree those policies should operate uniformally across the UK, shared between the four governments in London, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast. The UK says it will consult the Scottish government on all changes to those policies, and try to seek agreement.

Sturgeon, the first minister and SNP leader, has decided that consultation is not enough, and insists that her government or Holyrood should be given the legal power to block any changes they disagree with. UK ministers have rejected this stance as an unacceptable veto.

With the EU withdrawal bill due for its final vote in the Commons within weeks, May is running out of time to reach a deal before it becomes law.

Sturgeon told an audience in London on Monday it was “three minutes to midnight”. She said: “What happens after tomorrow, the ball will be very much in the UK government’s court. Full Story

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