Russia winning Electronic war & Possible Saudi Coup

Russia winning Electronic war & Possible Saudi Coup
Is Russia’s Winning the Electronic War against US and the West

In Ukraine and Syria, Russian forces are using high-tech equipment to jam drones and block battlefield communications — and forcing the U.S. to scramble to catch up. It comes at different times, and in different forms. But as they have charted the war in southeast Ukraine over the past year, drones flown by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe have run into the same problem: Russian troops on the ground are jamming them into virtual blindness. It’s just one part of a sophisticated Russian electronic warfare (EW) effort in Ukraine that has proved a sobering experience for the U.S. Army. Faced with how the newly modernized Russian army is operating in Ukraine and Syria — using equipment like the Krasukha-4, which jams radar and aircraft — American military officials are being forced to admit they’re scrambling to catch up.

Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges, commander of U.S. Army units in Europe, has described Russian EW capabilities in Ukraine as “eye-watering.” Ronald Pontius, deputy to Army Cyber Command’s chief, Lt. Gen. Edward Cardon, told a conference this month that “you can’t but come to the conclusion that we’re not making progress at the pace the threat demands.Full Story

We stated that the best of the best hackers come from Russia, and the Russian government has the world’s most elite hacking force. Also, Under Putin they worked tremendously on developing weapons that were designed to neutralize much more expensive weapons systems the U.S had built. Rather than fight toe to toe, Putin decided it would be far cheaper and more effective to neutralize a multi-billion dollar weapon system with a million dollar counter system. It is working, the most advanced Aegis warships are no match for these advanced technologies. A few months ago we posted a story that illustrated how Russia completely shut down the most advanced of these warships. If you missed that event, here is a link that describes what took place last year http://www.voltairenet.org/article185860.html

A Possible Coup in Saudi Arabia Signals the End of US Dominance in the Mideast

If Saudi Arabia didn’t already have enough worries in a fast-changing Middle East, yet another crisis hit home for the desert kingdom: alleged hospitalization of King Salman, thought to have Alzheimer’s disease or some form of dementia. He only assumed the throne in January. While the 79-year-old monarch’s hospital stay surprised many in the West, the question global affairs and security analysts ask is: What might the future look like for Saudi Arabia now that the controversial king is sidelined? Will the rest of the royal family accept and allow Crown Prince Muhammad bin Nayef to lead? Or will the kingdom’s royal family see division within the ranks? These events could coalesce into a major political storm, significantly increasing the risk of instability not only within the kingdom but across the greater, strife-torn Middle East (if that’s even possible).

This turn of events comes on the heels of shocking news. London’s Guardian credits claims by an anonymous Saudi prince who states that two letters have circulated among senior members of the royal family encouraging them to stage a coup against King Salman. The rationale is the king and his powerful 30-year-old son, Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, have pursued dangerous policies that are leading the kingdom to political, economic and military ruin. Disclosure of these memos raises serious concerns. I find myself recalling the assassination of King Faisal in 1975. Should royal infighting reveal itself to the outside world, it’ll mark the start of the end for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as we know it. Far-reaching consequences will resound not only economically and politically but religiously and geopolitically. How? War in Yemen: The kingdom finds itself entangled in a conflict with a next-door neighbor with no end in sight. King Salman and his son miscalculated. The longer Saudi forces continue to engage the Houthis, the more likely internal dissension within the kingdom itself grows. Images broadcast on al-Jazeera show Saudi Arabia, an outrageously rich country, pummeling Yemen, one of the poorest in the Arab world. All this generates criticism of the Saudis and sympathy for Houthi rebels. The driving force behind the kingdom’s engagement in Yemen is the king’s son, serving as defense minister, who wants to show the world that, despite his youth, he can make tough calls. However, his actions in Yemen thus far demonstrate his reckless approach to international affairs, lack of experience and the absence of an exit strategy, leading to mounting costs for the kingdom in blood and treasure and growing international criticism.

Economic chaos: The drop in oil prices by more than 50 percent the past year is sending the kingdom’s economy into a tailspin. Thinking among Saudi elites was to (a) maintain the kingdom’s level of global oil production; (b) fight for its global market share; and (c) allow oil prices to collapse. Theoretically, this would eventually drive the competition — especially the United States — out of the energy business, paving the way for a subsequent return to higher oil prices. But the strategy proved to be ill-conceived. The result is the kingdom’s deficit approaching 20 percent — more than $100 billion. This outcome compels the kingdom to deplete. Full Story

What do you think will happen after Russia decides to equip these guys with advanced weapons like the Saudis are doing right now with the so-called moderate rebels in Syria (who are in fact nothing but bloodthirsty animals). The trend is is set; based on the Russian Mindset, the Saudi’s will be made to pay.  The only question that remains is by how much.

Other articles of Interest: